Thursday, May 19, 2011

Carob What?

Peanut Butter + Bananas, in a tortilla? In a Created Whole Tortilla? Yeah, it doesn't get much better. Great for breakfast, a mid-afternoon snack, or a enjoy as a healthy and tasty dessert. Try something new and make homemade Carob Ice Creme. "Carob, what?", you say. Here's the 411 on Carob.

Carob is often used an alternative choice to Chocolate. Compared to Chocolate, carob is 3 times richer in calcium, has 1/3 less calories, and 17 times less fat! Carob is a legume and comes from an evergreen tree, that looks more like a shrub, native to the Mediterranean. After harvesting, the carob pods are roasted, and then ground into powder. Carob is naturally sweet and comes in powdered form or is available to buy as chips for baking or candy at specialty grocers. Take a look at this article to learn a bit more about Carob.

The Carob Ice Creme recipe is an easy, naturally sweetened, and tasty treat that, just like Tortillas, is another one of Tim's specialties. So give Carob a try and make Peanut Butter Banana Tortilla Roll-ups and Carob Ice Creme for Dessert Tonight!

Peanut Butter Banana Roll-ups
Peanut Butter
1 Banana
Created Whole Tortillas

Heat tortilla on a skillet over low to medium heat, for 2-3 mins or until warm. Remove from heat, and spread with peanut butter. Add banana slices and roll-up tortilla like a burrito. Top with Carob Ice Creme.

Carob Ice Creme

4 cups soymilk
1/2 cup carob powder
1 cup raw unsalted cashews
2 TBSP Vanilla Extract1 1/2 cups dates
1/2 tsp Sea Salt
2 Bananas, frozen

Place all ingredients in blender and blend well until smooth and creamy. Pour mixture into ice cream maker and freeze according to freezer instructions. (note: half this recipe if you have a quart size ice cream maker or only freeze half the recipe at a time. It freezes faster for obvious reasons. We use this Cuisinart ice cream maker, and it's awesome.

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Breakfast Burrito

Here's an idea for breakfast: Make some tofu scramble and wrap it up in a Whole Wheat Tortilla, and you got yourself a breakfast burrito.

Try this recipe

Scrambled Tofu

  • 1 lb firm tofu
  • 1 tsp chicken style seasoning (see chicken style season recipe below or use a vegan chicken style seasoning mix)
  • 2 Tbsp each: chopped green bell pepper, onion and sliced olives
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 4 Created Whole 100% Whole Wheat Tortillas
  • Avocado & Salsa

Place olive oil in pan. Add veggies and satay for 2 mins. Add tofu, and mash with a fork. Add seasoning and remaining ingredients. Cook for about 10 minutes over medium heat. Wrap scramble in a warm tortilla. Serve with avocado slices and fresh salsa. Serves 4

Chicken Style Seasoning

  • 4 tsp celery salt
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 4 tsp onion powder
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp marjoram
  • 4 tsp parsley flakes, ground
  • Pinch savory
  • ¼ cup salt
  • 1 tsp brown sugar

Mix all ingredients together. Store in airtight container. 1 tsp of this seasoning may be substituted for one packet of George Washington Golden seasoning or McKay’s Chicken Seasoning. When substituting for McKay’s Chicken Seasoning, use less salt in recipe.

order tortillas at

Sunday, March 27, 2011

The March Madness of Italy and Illinois

I'm on the home stretch of 19 days of flying and living in Rockford, Illinois. This temporary home and work was preceded by 10 days off adventuring through Italy.

Hello Work Life. Living life near Chicago
Travel Fun and The Duomo. Florence, Italy

Besides the obvious of being located on another continent and conversing in a different languages, the cultural and daily aspects of life also contrast. In Italy, and all of Europe, walking is as normal as breathing. In Rockford, Illinois, sidewalks are basically non-existent, and it's typical to ask the hotel driver to take the other stews and I across the intersection to Starbucks. Walking through the canals of Venice somewhat lost


That brings me to another point. As Starbucks is creating the "Trenta," a coffee cup that holds 31 ounces of liquid, while Europeans are quite content where the size of a cappuccino in there world is about 5 fluid ounces. And, if you order that standard cafe to go, it will arrive in something similar to a dixie cup. I usually do not drink coffee in the states because I don't care for the caffeine crash and the coffee chemicals generally give me a tummy ache. I experienced nothing of the sort in Italy, and cappuccinos were more than once on the trip a highlight of my day. After returning from Italy, I've unsuccessfully tried to re-inact this morning experience. Coffee just doesn't come in any less than 12 ounces and the flavor is horrid.

The Size of A Trenta And Your Stomach

Morning Cappuccino in Venice, Italy

Why do Americans automatically assume bigger is better?

Bigger is noted every time the girls and I go to various Rockford restaurants. One entree order is usually enough to feed a family of 4. Is that really necessary? This either creates a lot of waste or a lot of waist. I think we most often see the second, which is paired with the health challenges and complications of diabetes, heart attacks, and a lower quality of life.

Fast-food isn't fast in Europe. The culture enjoys life. Italians enjoy their food, their wine, and their gelato. Life isn't necessarily a slower place, but the culture savors the moments. Statistics have shown that the more often people eat on the go, in their cars, or distracted, the more likely they will be overweight.

Americans need to take note of our European friends. Walking won't kill us. Trenta's might. And slowdown! When was the last time you enjoyed a dinner with your family, sitting down without the TV on?

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Traveling Nutrition Challenges or Creativity? You Choose!

Traveling puts a new perspective on the day to day. Along with new sites, meeting new people, and maybe dealing with language and culture differences, one has to face different habits and practices when it comes to food and eating. Out of the entire month of March, I've spent all of 2 nights at my apartment (I just cringe when I think of that fact and my LA rent...ughhh). But, the lack of time in LA, has lent itself to the adventures of 10 days in Italy, and I'm currently finishing up a 19 day work assignment in Rockford/Chicago, Illinois.

When it comes to your nutrition, living out of a hotel, hostel, or spending an entire day on an airplane or wandering airports, creates either challenges or lends a hand to a creativity, depending on how you want to look at it. Sometimes healthy options are not readily available, and you are forced to make the best choice that you can, or you must give yourself full permission to embrace the experience.When you are constantly on the go, it's hard to plan ahead with your meals, but there are some simple things that you can do, that will save you time, money, and the headache of finding yourself starving, and nothing available to eat.

Here are some tips for when you are on-the-go:

  • Pack raw almonds in your carry-on bag. Protein and healthy fats keep you satisfied.

  • LaraBars are awesome; easy to pack, all raw, and contain lots of fiber.

  • Drink water! It's soooo easy to let yourself get dehydrated when traveling. Take an empty Klean Kanteen with you through security and fill it up on the other side. You save money and help reduce environmental impact.

  • Eat as balanced as possible when you are traveling. You feel more jet lagged and tired when you are just grabbing candy and sweets.

  • And probably the best tip, and I'm serious when I say this because I've learned from experience; Tortillas are awesome to have in your bag when you travel! It's so much better than the Kraft packaged snacks that Southwest dishes out or the snack packs that you pay a pretty penny for. Take Justin's individually packaged Nut Butter's with you or individually packaged hummus, or of course, I just eat tortillas straight. When you leave for the airport, take your tortillas out of the freezer, and when you eventually reach your destination, just put them back in the fridge...that's if there are any left after that 10 hour flight:)

Tortillas took a trip to Whistler, B.C.

Best Mountain Snack EVER!

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Make Burritos For Lunch!

Ethnic foods are gaining in popularity. The Hispanic population is growing faster than the overall population in the United States, and due to this, Latin foods are becoming more popular among consumers. The Hispanic population encompasses 15 percent of the total population in the U.S., and that number is expected to grow to 30 percent by 2050. Sales of Hispanic foods are at 7 billion dollars annually, and expected to rise to 12 billion by 2014.

Until recently, ethnic foods in the natural marketplace were hard to find, but since 1990 the ethnic purchasing power has more than doubled. This generation is the most diverse in American history, and with that diversity comes an opportunity for unique, tasty, and healthy products.

What's so cool about being in the tortilla business is that we don't have to educate people on what a tortilla is; everyone knows. I think the surprise comes when people realize that a whole wheat tortilla can actually taste good. One of our biggest compliments is when one of our Hispanic friends or customers say, "I grew up on grandma's or mom's homemade tortillas and these [Created Whole Tortillas] are GOOD!"

We are really blessed to be entering the market at this time, with such an exceptional product. The opportunities ahead of us are limitless.

Make burritos for lunch!

information and facts taken from the following articles:
Ethnic Cuisine Heats up Naturals Market
Hispanic Foods Heat up the Market